The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost
Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
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  • For those of us that are rookies to the draft horse world, it is a gold mine of information, not to mention stunning photography & excellent human interest stories!

    – Karen Sedotal

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Draft Horse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

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  • For those of us that are rookies to the draft horse world, it is a gold mine of information, not to mention stunning photography & excellent human interest stories!

    – Karen Sedotal

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Draft Horse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

The Tide Chasers & The Fish Run

Many years ago–in another century, another millennium even, before the time of the railways–fishermen were faced with a serious problem whenever the king of France wanted to eat fresh fish. The fishing ports on the coast of Normandy were at least 100 miles from the capital–many were over 150 miles. The king aside, there was a demand for fish, especially since the Catholic church had encouraged the consumption of fish on Fridays. Out of this came the profession known in French as the “Chasse Marées” or Tide Chasers. On average, it took a minimum of four days to travel by coach from the ports to Paris, so a system was put in place to get the fresh fish there–not just for the king’s table, but for all the markets–in 24 to 34 hours. This is what the Tide Chasers did ... with the help of their draft horses

Click here to read more!

Weighing In With Harness Bob

A Visit With Bob Schrock of Shipshewana Harness & Supplies

Bob Schrock, known by most of his customers simply as "Harness Bob," didn't invent the horse blanket, caveson or curry comb any more than Henry Ford invented the automobile; or Steve Jobs invented the computer. But like Ford, who is credited with the innovation of assembly line production; and Jobs, who was one of the first to recognize the commercial potential of personal computers, Schrock recognized something that others hadn't. He realized that the one-stop-shop concept would be a successful model for the heavy horse industry, and he capitalized on it. His business, Shipshewana Harness & Supplies in Shipshewana, Indiana, has done very well and few that own heavy horses are unfamiliar with it, or with Bob himself.

We caught up with Bob to pick his brain about the enterprise ... lots of other things.

Read more in the Spring 2021 issue!

 

Three Belgian Mares That Shaped the Breed

The true broodmare is a breed-enhancing individual who transmits to her offspring, as they do to theirs, those characteristics and qualities which breeders consider desirable.

The true broodmare is prepotent. As defined by Dr. Jay Lush of Iowa State College in the November 1938 Breeder’s Gazette: “Prepotency is the ability of a parent to impress its characteristics on its offspring more uniformly than average parents can.” To the professor’s definition I would add the words: “consistent” and “persistent.” The transmission of the mare’s good qualities must not only be uniform, it must be consistent, not sporadic. And it must be persistent. These valuable traits may disappear for a generation or two (or 15 or 20), but sooner or later those family features will surface again.

In the history of the Belgian breed, there were hundreds of mares who left a positive mark. Some of those marks went deeper than others.

Read about three Belgian mares that shaped the breed in the Spring 2021 issue!

Belgian Stepping Stones

All of the draft breeds were worse off when World War II ended in 1945 than they had been before it started. The mechanization of agriculture was well underway and breeding was grinding to a halt. The Belgians, however, had retained a larger number of animals, in large part because they'd started with more ... and in particular, more young horses. Interestingly, several stallions from the era have emerged as cornerstones of the modern Belgian breed. Who were they?

Click here to find out!

Nation Elk Refuge Sleigh Rides

One of the most unique draft horse experiences in the country is tucked away in western Wyoming, offering breathtaking views of the Tetons and a rare opportunity to view elk, bison, bighorn sheep, mule deer, wolves, coyotes and eagles. This one-of-a-kind operation is located on the National Elk Refuge in Jackson, Wyoming, and has been operating as a government contract operation since 1965, when the Jaycees first offered sleigh rides. Today the sleigh and wagon ride program is managed by Double H Bar through a contract with the Grand Teton Association for the National Elk Refuge. The sleigh rides offer an intimate way to view wildlife since the elk are tolerant of the horses and sleighs.

Read more about about this experience in the Winter 2020-'21 issue!

 

Steve Andrews — Gentleman of the Highest Bid

In terms of what's changed in the heavy horse scene over the past four decades, it would be far easier to list what hasn't changed. The value of draft horses, for example, has peaked and slumped, risen and fallen, and found new heights yet again. From the highs of the late '70s and early '80s to the lows of the late '80s, all the way through to the current boom, the public auctions are where it's played out most noticeably. It's where the action is and has always been. Through each of these chapters, one distinct voice from the auction block has been a constant. By profession, Steve Andrews of Wooster, Ohio, is identified as an auctioneer, but he is far more. He deserves, in fact, at least part of the credit for the very state of the heavy horse market in America.

Learn more about Steve's auctioneer career in the Winter 2020-'21' issue!

History of Draft Horses

The Industrial Revolution proved to be responsible for both the rise and collapse of the heavy horse in America. Demand for draft animals was spurred on by the growing transportation, construction and agricultural needs of the nation. The last half of the 19th century made draft horse breeding both essential and profitable. Massive importations from Europe took place. The period also ushered in the development of the present day breeds of heavy horses. The number of horses and mules in The United States peaked in 1920, at about 26 million. The groundwork for today’s agriculture had been laid. The horse lost the battle of the streets to the automotive industry rather quickly. As for the battle of the agricultural fields, it fought very tenaciously, but eventually yielded in most cases to greatly improved tractor power. By 1950, it was indeed, on thin ice... Read more

History of The Draft Horse Journal

The post WW II years were not kind to the draft horse and mule. Both horse numbers and horse use plummeted. The number of animals being exhibited dwindled and many shows dropped heavy horses altogether. The industry needed a boost and it got one when the first issue of The Draft Horse Journal was published in May 1964. New interest was stimulated and the heavy horse has since made a convincing resurgence. From the 28 pages in the first issue to over 300 in recent ones, The Journal has grown, evolved and progressed right along with the draft horse trade. In addition to the magazine’s traditional content, covering breeding, raising, showing, selling and using all breeds of heavy horses, the modern version includes veterinary advice from “America’s Draft Horse Vet,” Dr. A.J. Neumann; historical accounts by the publication’s founder, Maurice Telleen; legal advice from Ken Sandoe;... Read more

Draft Horse and Mule Youth & Beginners Manual

"This is the first bulletin prepared by the DRAFT HORSE & MULE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA which was incorporated in the state of Illinois in October of 1980. It contains information that should prove valuable to the new or beginning draft horse and mule owner, whether he or she be a youth or an adult.

"Several men with many years of experience have given generously of their time to help prepare this bulletin. We do not claim that it is without error, we only hope to give you some information that will make it more interesting and hopefully contribute to your success, as you begin working with man's most noble helper–the draft horse and mule." Click here to download

Hello DHJ!

I have thoroughly enjoyed each and every page of each publication plus all your online FB info and don't want to miss a thing!

Thank you for all your hard work and may I add, your touches of humor in the magazine. For those of us that are rookies to the draft horse world, it is a gold mine of information not to mention stunning photography and excellent human interest stories. My pages have underlines and post it notes and are shown to my neighbors who are always amazed at the photographs of the horses and what they can do. Nothing spreads interest like an adorable little foal, too. I am so thrilled at having met a few of these people that show up on the pages and recognize many, many names that I look forward to meeting. It's a wonderful retirement for me to be able to participate in this equine world, it sure brings back memories of my life as a farm kid and my riding horses. Thank you again! Stay safe!

Karen Sedotal
Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Letter to the Editor

I would like to take this opportunity: the Draft Horse Journal’s fiftieth year in publication: to acknowledge and bestow gratitude upon, not only the founders of this fine magazine, but the current editor and his team who relentlessly strive to unify our industry through their quality quarterly publication.


The draft horse industry is not a product-driven industry. We do not yield an item that humans willingly wish to consume; like milk, meat, feathers or fur. Except for a rare sliver of history, when naturally-synthesized premarin was of value, the draft horse has contributed little in the last 75 years... Read more