Emotions stir deep inside when it comes to horses, whether it’s tending to a favorite mare giving birth in the early morning dawn, or standing on the curb watching a team of mighty Percherons prance down the avenue during a small town parade. It happens when a little child reaches up and feels the softness of a muzzle for the very first time, and continues when a seasoned teamster says goodbye to an old pal in the pasture. There’s no denying horses have a way of touching our souls like no other animal. This was the case recently when the…
Part II In Part I of this two part article on equine colic I broadly classified colics into seven categories. To repeat, they are: Verminous colic; Spasmodic colic; Flatulent and stomach dilation or Gas colic; colic due to Gastric Duodenal Ulcers and Enteritis; Intestinal obstruction due to malposition; Impaction colic; Colic due to pregnancy in the mare; and Azoturia of the intestinal tract. This is a very broad classification of colics but it will aid the ordinary stockman to understand the nature and causative factors associated with the colic syndrome in the equine family. As promised, in this issue of…
(From the April, May and June 1930 Breeder’s Gazettes and the general news of the times) As it is with most times, the world was a very unpeaceful place 75 years ago if you concentrated on just the headlines and big pictures. As for millions of the little pictures, I’m sure they contained a lot of very happy people. Two of today’s major powers with rapidly growing economies, China and India, were unhappy places. In spite of their past civilizations, dynasties, temples and antiquities, they were anything but economic powerhouses 75 years ago. They had both been pretty well milked…
(From breed publications and general news sources of the times) Two of the real giants of the last century got off the stage in April of 1955. They were Winston Churchill from Great Britain and Albert Einstein who had called Princeton University home since taking refuge in this country from Hitler’s fanaticism in 1933. They were about as unlike as two men could be. We will take Churchill first. On April 5, 1955, Sir Winston Churchill, then 80 years of age, resigned his post as Prime Minister. Now, some 50 years later, he was recently voted the “Greatest Briton that…
(From general news, the breed publications and our own 1980 issues.) I’d say that Jimmy Carter’s presidency hit rock bottom on April 18 with the abortive Hostage Rescue Mission to free the 52 Americans being held in the American Embassy in Tehran. It was snakebit from the git-go. Eight helicopters full of commando-type troops were involved. When they landed in the desert to refuel, one of the choppers collided with a transport plane and eight soldiers were killed. To add insult to injury Secretary of State Vance, who had been against it, resigned. It was not one of our finest…
Disclaimer - This article is intended as general discussion and information on the topic covered, and is not to be construed as rendering legal advice. If legal advice is needed, you should contact an attorney. This article may not be reprinted or reproduced in any manner without prior written permission of the author. Sit back, relax and read for enjoyment. This column will review some recent cases considered to be on the fringe of domestic animal law. Domestic animals are defined essentially as horses, dogs and cats. Other pets may be included but for purposes of this article we are…
Volunteers are special people. They give freely of their time and labor, often of their own money, asking no return for their efforts. They are vital to the success of our country, which would fall apart were it not for the work of volunteers. I cannot name a heavy horse show that does not depend on volunteers. They serve in many ways. The men and women who arrange sponsorship, ribbons and show schedules; serve as stewards, gatemen, ringmen, announcers and clerks; who organize, manage and transport. Too often their tasks are taken for granted. Without these people, there could be…
I am a student of the cow. I have come to conclude that cows lead a fairly boring life. When I am giving cows their sporadic weekly check, I think it’s probably the high point of their day. They graze their life away and if they are not grazing they are chewing their cud. This cud is part of a magnificent ruminant digestive process that allows them to digest foodstuffs that are virtually inedible to simple-stomached animals like people. For instance, cows derive nutritional benefit from lettuce! Who’d’a thunk it? Now, I’ll grant you that people eat lettuce but they…

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