The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost
Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
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  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

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  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

2015 Clydesdale Youth/Novice Congress

The first ever Clydesdale Youth/Novice Congress has just ended, but the memories, learning and friendships will go on and on! The Clydesdale Breeders of the U.S.A. felt a responsibility to educate and draw new people into the Clydesdale breed, and so the idea of a Congress was proposed. Many folks have asked what exactly the Clydesdale Youth/Novice Congress is. I will base the reflective answer to that question in this editorial.

It Began With a Need
The Clydesdale industry–the draft horse industry in general–has been one of great family tradition. Many of us have been lucky in our lives to have had family, or a mentor to teach us about the trade. As the industry became a bit fragile due to the recessed economy, the need surfaced to do more to bring new people in and also to show support of those trying to become involved. Read more

HPD 2015
Right as Rain

Coined in the 1500s by some medieval wiseman, you have to admit that “Make hay when the sun shines” is sensible, pragmatic and even a little poetic, though its clichéd use today appears most often in non-farm contexts. Incidentally, only the figurative reference–to make the most of one’s opportunities–could possibly apply to the 22nd Annual Horse Progress Days (HPD), since the literal sense proved “difficult”. June rainfall totals for Montgomery, Indiana, exceeded 11 inches, where the average is just a smidge over four. It has simply been “one of those years.” The unique set of circumstances this created made for a challenge the likes of which the organizers of HPD had never faced. Progress does not and will not wait for bluebird days, or even marginally tolerable ones. Fortunately, neither will HPD. “The show must go on.” You get the drift without further proverbs. Read more in the Autumn issue!

Letter to the Editor

I would like to take this opportunity: the Draft Horse Journal’s fiftieth year in publication: to acknowledge and bestow gratitude upon, not only the founders of this fine magazine, but the current editor and his team who relentlessly strive to unify our industry through their quality quarterly publication.


The draft horse industry is not a product-driven industry. We do not yield an item that humans willingly wish to consume; like milk, meat, feathers or fur. Except for a rare sliver of history, when naturally-synthesized premarin was of value, the draft horse has contributed little in the last 75 years... Read more

The Horsemen’s Round Table: The Orphan Foal

It’s definitely not something to look forward to, but if you breed horses long enough, you’ll more than likely be faced at some point with an orphan foal. It may be the result of the mare’s death during or after foaling, an aggressive or otherwise poor mother or simply a mare’s inability to produce milk. Whatever the reason, when it occurs, you are faced with one of the most challenging situations that any horse breeder can be dealt: feeding, raising and managing an orphan foal.

Here’s the good news: the situation is manageable. You CAN raise a healthy foal that can reach its full potential. Fortunately (or unfortunately, depending on how you see things), there are several within our industry... Read more

Highest Selling Belgian Mare

Clanging the bell at the Midwest Select Sale was Coffins Creek Belle, 3-year-old Belgian mare to Darrel Drain, Stoney Lake Belgians, Lakefield, ON, Canada, from Freeman J. Helmuth, Hazleton, IA, at $64,000. This price effectively distinguishes her as the all-time highest-selling Belgian mare at any public auction, surpassing Le Shania, the 3-year-old, that sold at the 2006 Mid-America Sale for $55,000. Incidentally, Le Shania also went to an Ontario horseman (Stewart Crabb). Coffins Creek Belle, bred by Randy & Barbara Fiddelke, also achieves the designation as the 4th highest-selling draft horse ever. Read the full sale report from the Midwest Select Sale and others in the Summer 2015 DHJ!

Letter to the Editor

I would like to take this opportunity: the Draft Horse Journal’s fiftieth year in publication: to acknowledge and bestow gratitude upon, not only the founders of this fine magazine, but the current editor and his team who relentlessly strive to unify our industry through their quality quarterly publication.


The draft horse industry is not a product-driven industry. We do not yield an item that humans willingly wish to consume; like milk, meat, feathers or fur. Except for a rare sliver of history, when naturally-synthesized premarin was of value, the draft horse has contributed little in the last 75 years... Read more

History of Draft Horses

The Industrial Revolution proved to be responsible for both the rise and collapse of the heavy horse in America. Demand for draft animals was spurred on by the growing transportation, construction and agricultural needs of the nation. The last half of the 19th century made draft horse breeding both essential and profitable. Massive importations from Europe took place. The period also ushered in the development of the present day breeds of heavy horses. The number of horses and mules in The United States peaked in 1920, at about 26 million. The groundwork for today’s agriculture had been laid. The horse lost the battle of the streets to the automotive industry rather quickly. As for the battle of the agricultural fields, it fought very tenaciously, but eventually yielded in most cases to greatly improved tractor power. By 1950, it was indeed, on thin ice... Read more

History of The Draft Horse Journal

The post WW II years were not kind to the draft horse and mule. Both horse numbers and horse use plummeted. The number of animals being exhibited dwindled and many shows dropped heavy horses altogether. The industry needed a boost and it got one when the first issue of The Draft Horse Journal was published in May 1964. New interest was stimulated and the heavy horse has since made a convincing resurgence. From the 28 pages in the first issue to over 300 in recent ones, The Journal has grown, evolved and progressed right along with the draft horse trade. In addition to the magazine’s traditional content, covering breeding, raising, showing, selling and using all breeds of heavy horses, the modern version includes veterinary advice from “America’s Draft Horse Vet,” Dr. A.J. Neumann; historical accounts by the publication’s founder, Maurice Telleen; legal advice from Ken Sandoe;... Read more